2011/02/19

'They didn't run away. They faced the bullets head-on'

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After Egypt's revolution, the people have lost their fear
By Robert Fisk in Bahrain
Saturday, 19 February 2011
'They didn't run away. They faced the bullets head-on.'
GETTY IMAGES
'They didn't run away. They faced the bullets head-on.'
"Massacre – it's a massacre," the doctors were shouting. Three dead. Four dead. One man was carried past me on a stretcher in the emergency room, blood spurting on to the floor from a massive bullet wound in his thigh.
A few feet away, six nurses were fighting for the life of a pale-faced, bearded man with blood oozing out of his chest. "I have to take him to theatre now," a doctor screamed. "There is no time – he's dying!"
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/they-didnt-run-away-they-faced-the-bullets-headon-2219267.html
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Robert Fisk: 



Dark humour in a time of dictatorship

Saturday, 19 February 2011


In an old and rather tatty gift shop in the Zamalek district of Cairo this week, I asked the owner if he had a photograph of Saad Zaghloul for sale. No sooner said than done.
Out from a paper bag at the back of the shop came a portrait of the great man, father of Egypt's real independence struggle, hero of 1919 when the Egyptian people – secular and religious, Muslim and Copt, men and women together – rose up in street demonstrations and industrial strikes to demand their freedom from Britain. It sounds familiar. It should. Here is a quotation from Mohammed Rifaat's Awakening of Modern Egypt which could have been written by any of us these past three weeks.



http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/fisk/robert-fisk-dark-humour-in-a-time-of-dictatorship-2219317.html