2011/03/10

No we have to have Hope we have to continue doing that

The Libya revolutionaries and people are more or less in a similar situation to what the Spanish people were during the Spanish civil war.

The world will do nothing until its interests are affected. Moral questions are not at all connectecd. It's all about oil and the price of oil.

The horrible truth is that a divided and broken Libya will suit 


everyone's i.e. the various powers to be ___

 interests just fine.

Genuine democracies
are not defacto

in the interests of the
capitalist

states

.


 its like

No we have to have
Hope
we have to continue doing that





 Please Please people
do not a abandon us. Do more than just watch


and the revolutionaries remind us


that this


 is not civil war.




 The various countries that colonized North Africa are complicit.









 Suddenly the Americans and the rest of them want to do the right thing; Hypocrites, two faced self interested  . Empire. What did we expect?


This . ANd nothing else. Who'd have been foolish  to believe otherwise
---------------
 A weak Libya will be easier to manipulate. after it's over.




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AMY GOODMAN: For more on the issue of a no-fly zone, we 






go to Libya.Democracy Now! correspondent Anjali Kamat 




spoke to a member of the Libyan opposition in Benghazi 






about foreign intervention and a no-fly zone.






ESSAM GHERIANI: Well, I am Essam Gheriani. I am a


field member of the Coalition of the 17th of


February. We keep very close contact with the


transitional—the provisional national council.




ANJALI KAMAT: Can you explain what the position of


the council is on the issue of foreign intervention in


Libya?
ESSAM GHERIANI: Our position, the provisional




national council’s position, was made very clear


through the request that we put out about five or six


days ago. And it was a very logistical intervention


that included a no-fly zone, imposition of no-fly zone


over Libya, also the bombardment of certain




locations such as the barracks where he keeps his


mercenaries, his Bab al-Azizia compound and other


security forces barracks that he has around Tripoli


and near to Sabha and near to Tripoli, as well. We


did not request, and we insist on not requesting, any


land troops intervention.
ANJALI KAMAT: Do you believe that international


intervention is needed in order to liberate all of


Libya?


ESSAM GHERIANI: I mean, we’ve been hearing lots of


the European Union and the United States and the


United Nations—I wouldn’t want to say they’re


taking their own sweet time in order to negotiate or


to discuss the Libyan issue. What I would like to—I


would like of them to realize that every day that


goes on, more casualties are falling. And now, with


our small armed forces, the casualties have become


on both sides. As long as this thug is not dealt with


internationally and directly, I think this situation


could go on for a long time, because he’s got the


money, which we don’t, and he’s got the military


equipment that we don’t.
ANJALI KAMAT: And finally, I’ve read a lot of


commentators in the West fearing that what’s


happening in Libya could lead to a civil war erupting


in Libya.
ESSAM GHERIANI: There is no such possibility,


because civil wars needs, I mean, warring parties.


OK, we don’t have any warring parties. We have the


people of Libya on one side against Gaddafi and his


thugs on the other side. That’s what we have.
ANJALI KAMAT: Given that the international


community has long held Muammar Gaddafi to be a


sort of a pariah and imposed sanctions on him


previously, what impact do you think sanctions or an


ICC even an arrest warrant would have on his power?
ESSAM GHERIANI: The military intervention that we


had requested, we are quite confident that the


moment that it is applied, that it is—that a step




towards it is taken, the Gaddafi regime would fall




within 48 hours. We don’t expect it to survive more


than that. It’s just a matter that right now he has


absorbed the first shock of the revolution over the


first week. And now we know that, daily, there are


mercenaries that are coming into Libya from the


south, and he’s moving them towards the north.
Now, it would be a tragedy if the international


community would allow him, through the use of


mercenaries, to retake the country. Do they think


that if he retakes over the country, is there any


moral ground or ethical ground to deal with such a


regime? I don’t know. I don’t think so. And I believe


there isn’t. But some other politicians may look at it


a different way. And I hope that they do not think


that there is ever a possibility to deal with such a


thug.
Time is very, very crucial.



Libya is a very small


population, where, I mean, even the death of one


person is a big loss, let alone the death of hundreds.


And today, we’re talking about more than 3,500


deaths that we can assume have taken place. This is


ridiculous. This is shameful for the international


community to allow such a massacre to take place


and keep on taking their own sweet time to discuss


whether to interfere or not to interfere. I think,


morally, they’re obligated to take a quick position and




save this country and put a stop or put an end to the


bloodshed that we’re facing.


______________________________________ Better food banks working out the U.N. than thriving and self sufficient democracies.


http://english.aljazeera.net/watch_now/











Even Amy goodman does not get it. She keeps using the word Rebel leader, and rebels. What's wrong with these people?